• Description from Conference Program:

    Flipping the Classroom is the just start. Combine PBL with the flipped classroom to engage students and differentiate and personalize learning for all students. Learn best flipping practices aligned to the essential elements of Project Based Learning, and examine sample PBL Flipped Projects.

  • “teach through the project”, i.e. don’t teach and then assign the project; the project should be the teaching
  • student voice and choice
  • asking questions: use a Twitter hashtag and have students tweet questions; lino it? (beta? what is this? Googled it and found it here; seems similar to Wallwisher / Padlet at first glance? but haven’t investigated further)
  • flipping should not be used as a way to add more time to class to learn content, i.e. I’ve run out of time in class, so go watch this video to finish it off
  • flipped videos / content should not be mandatory; students should have access to them as they need them
  • hardest thing about PBL is teacher stepping off the stage, letting students choose and go
  • Goals of homework:
    • fluency building
    • application
    • spiral review
    • extension
  • flipped videos are too often assigned too early in the learning process, i.e. students should have some familiarity with material before the videos (and I do hear this from students, that they don’t understand and then get turned off)
  • “the sudden release of responsibility” = the teacher lets the students go too quickly to instructional videos / flipped content
  • “DIY School” = when teacher absolves themselves of responsibility and lets students go entirely on their own
  • projects should have an individual component and a group component
  • “It’s all about formative assessment”: teachers often ask how they know if students watched the videos
  • “Feed up” = establishing purpose, using formative assessment to inform next steps; check for understanding, feed back, feed forward (using student performance for “next steps”)
  • Checking for understanding: oral language, questioning, written language, projects and performance, tests, common assessments and consensus scoring
  • formative assessments shouldn’t be graded; the averaging process harms student improvement, i.e. the movement from a C to an A should rewarded with an A (ish) rather than punished with an average; averaging punishes students for making mistakes
  • instruction and formative assessment must be linked
  • error vs. mistake: mistakes can be corrected; error is a fundamental conceptual gap that needs addressing
  • the flipped / formative cycle: formative assessment illustrates gaps that flipped content then addresses, which is individualized for students / groups based on what the formative assessment reveals
  • “If we dive too quickly into flipped, it just becomes putting videos online.”
  • Projects are summative assessments, a measure of competency
  • “A summative isn’t a summative until you decide it’s a summative. A formative isn’t a formative until you decide it’s a formative.” If you give a formative and students do well, it becomes a summative because goals have been met. Similarly, if students consistently miss a part of the summative, then perhaps it becomes a formative until that deficit is addressed.
  • “I will only reward you at your best.”
  • http://www.bie.org –> sample projects, searchable, etc.
  • “It’s not going to go well if you’re not formatively assessing. That’s where I first messed up. Every time something is learned or reviewed, there has to be a formative assessment because you won’t know where your kids are and you won’t know what to do next. If you do a good job of formatively assessing, you won’t know where to flip.”
  • finding audiences for the projects: just ask; survey parents at beginning of year about what they do and what they love to do (i.e. do outside of their job)
  • andrew@andrewkmiller.com
  • twitter.com/betamiller
  • http://www.andrewkmiller.com
  • a bit more on PBL itself than online learning / flipping but still a good presentation
  • he does a nice job integrating himself and his presentation; a charismatic and entertaining speaker
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