Eduardo Briceño, co-Founder and CEO of Mindset Works

  • Dweck’s fixed mindset vs. growth mindset: fixed identifies skills as static and unchanging / innate vs. growth that identifies skills as learnable and developable
  • Intelligence can be developed over time.
  • Thoughts occur when neurons fire together and connect; these change our brain and increase intelligence.
  • Albert Einstein an example of growth mindset: ‘It’s not that I’m so smart; it’s just that I stay with a problem longer.’
  • Growth mindset belief leads to different behavior which leads to (different) results.
  • Fixed mindset people want to look good / intelligent in front of people; they stick with what they know because they’re good at it.
  • Growth mindset people want to try new things that could fail.
  • Fixed mindset people look down on effort, that if effort is required then it shows weakness.
  • Growth mindset values effort.
  • Fixed: The fact that I’m struggling means that I’m incapable; they lose interest.
  • Growth: The fact that I’m struggling means that I’m going to persevere.
  • Experiment in Chile on sophomores taking a national test: growth mindset students were 3x more likely to score in the top 20%; fixed 4x more likely to be in bottom 20%.
  • Also found that lower socio-economic with growth mindset scored better than higher socio-economic with fixed mindset.
  • Growth mindset can be taught: Brainology.
  • Fostering growth mindset impacts achievement gap.
  • Teaching teachers the growth mindset allows them to focus on teaching methods rather than inherent qualities of students.
  • Telling students that they are good at something (or smart; ‘intelligence praise’) reinforces a fixed mindset (though intentions are good) because it identifies an innate ability; ‘effort praise’ (‘you must have tried really hard’) focuses on the process.
  • Students given the choice between an easy and difficult puzzle largely chose based on intelligence praise (easy) and effort praise (difficult).
  • Subsequent struggling impacts the confidence of the intelligence praise group but enables effort praise group to persevere.
  • Intelligence praise is designed to increase confidence but actually diminishes confidence.
  • Students were asked to tell their scores to students they didn’t know and would never see (at other schools). Intelligence praise group was 3x more likely to lie about their scores.
  • Focus on what you’re teaching. Used to be content. Is it still? Higher order skills? Learning motivation and efficacy?
Advertisements