Classical Play Project Redux / 2017 – Text Debate

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So the Classical Play Project is back. You might remember “The Michaels” (links / entries are not necessarily in chronological order), the modern adaptation of Plautus’ Menaechmi that my Classical Lit class worked on last year. One of the big questions was whether or not we would do it again this year.

But this year’s class is on board, so off we go. This year, though, with a twist. The class has elected to pen and perform a play for the elementary schools. More to come on all of that but we had a pleasantly spirited debate about the text / subject matter in class and I managed to video some of it which I include below. (And the lapel-camera quality is me getting used to a new lens I got for the iPad.)

And, as these things often go, despite what the video suggests, we ultimately did not decide on Hercules but rather (back to) Pyramus and Thisbe.

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

The Swivl Expand Lens

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As a Swivl Pioneer, I received a set of Swivl Expand lenses for use in classroom and group-work observations. I’ve not had a chance to pilot them yet in full flower, so to speak, but did a get-to-know-you session with one of the lenses yesterday in class. Pretty cool, I must say. I’ve pasted below some screenshots from the Swivl Expand website that illustrates and explains what they are and what they’re for, and below that I’ve embedded a quick video from my class that shows it with and without the lens. Full disclosure, I’m using the lens without the Swivl case, which includes a stabilizer for the lens, which explains some of the choppiness, but I’m excited to use them and I’ll let you know how it goes.

Screen Shot 2017-04-26 at 7.25.03 AMScreen Shot 2017-04-26 at 7.25.25 AM

ScreenFlow from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Latin Movie Trailers

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At long last, the Latin Movie Trailers. Here they are in all of their glory (or lack thereof). In no particular order (except I did put Rogue One (Furcifer Unus) first because I believe the BluRay comes out today or hereabouts). Enjoy.

Rogue One

Inception

 

Despicable Me

 

Toy Story 3

 

Song of the Sea

Baby Boss

My Movie – Small from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Slumdog Millionaire

FCB2A039-8796-48FD-B413-4808E570CBE0_HQ from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Sleeping Beauty

Movie Trailer from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Beauty and the Beast

Beauty and the Beast Latin from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Jungle Book

Latin Movie Project (1) from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Wall-E

WALL-E Latin Project from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

To Kill A Mockingbird

Latin Movie Project-1 from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Wallace and Grommit

Beauty and the Beast (a different one)

Princess Mononoke

Grand Budapest Hotel

Apple Distinguished Educator Denial

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I had applied to be an ADE this time around and just found out yesterday that I was not chosen. A bummer, to be certain, but not entirely surprising; it is a difficult admission to achieve and I wasn’t entirely confident in my video. With that said, as I made the video, going through old materials, reviewing my own career with technology, I will admit that I felt more confident as the process went along than when I decided to apply.

I write this really for two reasons. One, for the simple act of transparency. I did it. It didn’t work out. Here it is. Two, a bit more tricky. Here is Apple’s email:

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Perhaps I’m being a bit sensitive here, but, as a humanities teacher and believer, I find the primacy of ‘Everyone Can Code’ in the opportunities-to-engage-with-Apple suggestions a bit disconcerting. I understand too that the code movement is not entirely a STEM phenomenon and that the humanities in many ways have been at the vanguard of technology expansion and exploration. I’m also not saying that I wasn’t chosen because of my humanities interest and teaching.

With all of that said, however, assuming that there are plenty of humanities teachers who applied and were denied, it does seem a touch tone-deaf to lead with something so antithetical to their training and day-to-day work (however much Apple may want us to expand our horizons), especially in this era of STEM-dominance and humanities-survival (or lack thereof).

Am I bitter? I’m not sure that’s quite the right word, but I will reluctantly admit that I am on that spectrum. I guess I’m just concerned that everyone has forgotten how many STEM advancements were made with the simple yet powerful training that the humanities provide (and, lest we forget, science and math and their offshoots are part of the humanities) and, as we move farther and farther away from that training, I wonder what we will lose as we gain other things.

Sed de hoc satis. On to the video. I’ve embedded it below. I thought it was a bit rushed (I was hoping they’d hit the pause button a few times) and I suspect it focused a bit too much on me and not enough on my students and the impact of (Apple) technology on them. That’s my utterly anecdotal assessment.

ADE Video from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

Grading Presentations with Noteshelf and the ApplePen

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I have always graded student presentations on my computer using Excel. I have four categories, enter the grade and comments for each category on the computer during the presentation, and Excel does the math for the final grade.

Recently, though, I’ve been using my computer to project the presentations; I seemed to have some trouble with the frequent swapping in and out of multiple (student) computers. But if I use my computer to project, I can’t use it to grade.

This year I figured I would be able to use the iPadPro to grade. So I opened the spreadsheet via Dropbox in Excel and off I went. Except…the iPad told me that it was read-only (in Excel) and I had to convert it to be able to edit it, and the convert button didn’t seem to want to convert.

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So I took a screen shot of the spreadsheet and made it my default page in Noteshelf (see here for Noteshelf and other notetaking apps) and used the ApplePen to grade it.

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I screenshot the completed sheet for each student, uploaded it to Dropbox, and uploaded it to ItsLearning. As usual, the ApplePen made it worthwhile; I wouldn’t have wanted to do that with a regular stylus.

Screen Shot 2017-03-29 at 8.59.11 AM

Becoming a Swivl Pioneer

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I had applied to become a Swivl Pioneer and tonight was the introductory webinar. The company now seems to be focusing their technologies on individualized classroom observations, i.e. teachers using a Swivl set-up to observe up close individual student work. The Swivl+ app connects to devices at student workstations which then feed into the primary video of the teacher (student video is not necessary; by using Swivl microphones the same can be achieved with audio only). Teachers then use these closer perspectives of student work to assess the impact of lessons, classwork, engagement, emotion, etc. It seems both overwhelming and intriguing at the same time. I think my biggest question is how to manage that much video. The reason I prefer reading is that I can change my pace: I can skim or slow down based on relevance or interest. With video, I’m largely stuck (I know that I can change the speed). So I’m interested to get to know the system better.

Mirroring and Recording an iDevice on a Mac

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Saw this piece from iphoneinformer.com and was actually just wondering that. I had seen a Snapchat from the Boston Breakers (soccer team) that I thought would be interesting to post to my coaching blog, so I thought that would be a good way to try it out. So here’s the process (basics from iphoneinformer; screenshots and annotations from me):

  1. Plug in your iOS device to your Mac.
  2. Open Quicktime.
  3. From the File menu choose New Movie Recording.
  4. Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 7.29.02 AM
  5. When I first tried this, I mistakenly chose New Screen Recording (because it seemed intuitive) but that does not work. So it is New Movie Recording (and be prepared for that wonderful moment when the Facetime camera turns on and there you are).
  6. From the menu next to the record button, change the input to your device, which, if plugged in, will appear there.
  7. Screen Shot 2017-03-21 at 7.32.13 AM
  8. One thing to note is that I did not change the audio input (bottom arrow above) and so did not record the sound with the video. This was not enough to make me redo it; I didn’t really care about the sound, but it is worth noting that the audio input needs to be changed to capture any sound from the phone (and the iphoneinformer piece did not mention this).

Obviously this function can be used for recording instructions or how-tos, even game-casts, but a useful thing to know / have in the toolbox for when you need it.

Here’s the video that I recorded (again, without the sound):

Untitled from Ed DeHoratius on Vimeo.

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